Maricopa.gov HomepageContact Us (Popup Window)
Site Map | Search | Phone Directory | Departments | Services
Return to Homepage  
   Parks Home   |  News   |  Search Parks   |  Parks Commission   |  Quick Glance

 
 
 

Biking
Camping
Events
Hiking
History
How to Get Here
Horseback Riding
Maps
Park Itinerary
Picnicking
Rodeo Arena
RV's
Star Gazing
Trails

Home



 

 
 

About Us
Annual Pass
Arizona Academic Standards
Brochures & Artwork
Camping Terms and Conditions
Employment
Events
FAQ's
Fees
Geocaching
History of Park System
Maps
Maricopa Trail
Master Plan
Memorial Donations
Nature Centers
Other Links
Park Rules
Programs
Public Notices
Public Records Request
Reservations
Special Use Permits
Subscriptions
Surveys
Trail Rating Guide
Volunteer Opportunities
    - Adopt-A-Trail Program
Vulture Mountain
    - Hassayampa River Preserve
Wildlife / Plants

Search Parks

 
  Parks Home


 Events for Cave Creek 
<July 2014>
SMTWTFS
293012345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
272829303112
3456789

FIRE BAN INFORMATION
Effective
Tuesday, May 27, 2014 through Thursday, August 28, 2014
Maricopa County's regional parks will initiate the annual fire ban. This includes banning the use of all
campfire, fire pits and charcoal grills; however, it is still acceptable to use gas/propane grills in designated areas such as the ramada areas, semi-developed and developed camping sites, and along the shoreline at Lake Pleasant Regional Park.
If the parks do not receive ample rain during the monsoon season, the Maricopa County Parks and Recreation Department
may extend the fire ban to protect the parks resources and ensure visitor safety. To learn more, click here.

Cave Creek was named for the small stream that rises in the hills to the northeast and flows southwesterly for 25 miles before reaching Paradise Valley. The stream, in turn, was named from a high, overhanging bluff along its west bank that forms a wide, open cavern about two miles north of the present day Cave Creek. People have taken shelter there for centuries. A bloody skirmish occurred within the cave between Apache Indians and U.S. Troops in 1873.

Ancient Hohokam Indians stayed in the area from around 800 A.D. until 1400 A.D. Many reminders of their living in the area still remain. Stone huts, pit houses, terraced field and irrigation ditches were left behind. There are also many petroglyphs that were carved by the Indians. The Cave Creek area has a rich archeological foundation. Dozens of prehistoric sites have been discovered. However, many more remain undisturbed.

During the 1400's, bands of Apache Indians began drifting into the area. Soon, the Apaches spread throughout the State. They brought with them different lifestyles than the Hohokams. Instead of farming, the Apaches lived by hunting, gathering, and raiding.

The 1500's saw the arrival of Spanish explorers. The Spanish found the desert to be very inhospitable. On their maps, central Arizona was labeled as "deplobado" meaning, "desolate wilderness."

Mining began to become a focal point in central Arizona history in 1863. The call "Gold in the Bradshaws" rang out. Fabulous rich gold outcroppings were found in high peaks such as Antelope Hill. In 1864, Henry Wickenburg uncovered the richest strike, the Vulture Mine. Miners were sure that the Aqua Fria River, New River, Cave Creek and the stream of the Tonto were also rich with gold. A few miners tried to find the treasures, but met the Apaches who ran them out of the area. The Tonto Apaches controlled the area, so for the time being, mining had to wait. Ranchers and farmers followed lured by reports of mild climate, plentiful water, tall timbers and lush grass. All of the reports failed to mention that hostile Indians surrounded the area.

Of all the tribes in the area, the Tonto Apaches were the most feared. They ate animals they captured including horses, mules, oxen, and burros. The Tontos were highly mobile, unpredictable, and difficult to capture.

New comers to the State appealed to the Federal Government for assistance. The Civil War was demanding the need for every soldier. Washington leaders decided they did not want to lose the potential gold production capabilities of Arizona. In 1863, Arizona was declared a new and separate territory, splitting off from the territory of New Mexico. A Governor was sent to Arizona along with a small force of troops to Fort Whipple in Prescott.

In 1865, the army sent a small force of 300 volunteers from California to establish Fort McDowell. Fort McDowell was located 18 miles east of Cave Creek. One year after the Californians arrived, a regular army infantry unit settled into Fort McDowell. For 15 more years, skirmishes, ambushes, and bloody confrontations raged between the soldiers and the Tonto Apaches. On December 1, 1873, Lieutenant Walter S. Schuyler, of the 5th Cavalry, led a scouting expedition out of Fort McDowell that resulted in the first skirmish along Cave Creek. After weeks of searching for Indians, Lt. Schuyler and his troops found a band of Tontos held up on the West bank of Cave Creek. On Christmas morning the troops attacked the Tontos, killing 9, including one of the most fearless leaders named Nanotz.

Just North of Cave Creek, the area of Bloody Basin was the site of a bitter skirmish on March 27, 1873. Army scouts trailed a group of Apaches to the top of Turret Peak. The scouts crept up the peak during the night. At dawn they captured or killed nearly all of the Apaches.

The pressure on the Tonto Apaches began to have its effects. With the army destroying any discovered food storage areas, the Apaches were beginning to suffer. Hunger drove the Apaches to surrender. By 1877 about 5,000 Indians from various tribes shared the San Carlos Reservation.

The Battle of Turret Peak proved to be a major turning point. The time of the Tonto Apaches along Cave Creek was over and a new era of mining was coming to Cave Creek.

 

 


"Monsoon Madness!" - Cave Creek Regional Park - 8/8/2014
Desert Nights - Hike - Cave Creek Regional Park - 8/8/2014
Desert Denizen's - Cave Creek Regional Park - 8/9/2014
Feeding Frenzy! - Cave Creek Regional Park - 8/9/2014
Clay Mine Adventure! - Cave Creek Regional Park - 8/16/2014
Archery 101 a - Cave Creek Regional Park - 8/23/2014
Archery 101 b - Cave Creek Regional Park - 8/23/2014
Archery "OPEN RANGE"- Cave Creek Regional Park - 8/23/2014
Desert Nights - Hike - Cave Creek Regional Park - 8/30/2014
more...


Park Hours
Sun-Thu: 6 am - 8 pm
Fri-Sat: 6 am - 10 pm
- 365 days a year 

Summer Nature
Center Hours

Mon - Sat: 8 am - 3 pm

Admin. Office Hours
Mon - Fri: 8 am - 3 pm

Cave Creek Regional Park
37900 N. Cave Creek Parkway
Cave Creek, AZ 85331
Ph: 623-465-0431   Fax: 602-372-8596
Email: cavecreekpark@mail.maricopa.gov

 
Our Parks:  
Adobe Dam  |  Buckeye Hills  |  Cave Creek  |  Desert Outdoor Ctr  |  Estrella Mtn  |  Lake Pleasant  |  McDowell Mtn  |  San Tan Mtn  |  Spur Cross  |  Usery Mtn  |  White Tank
Main Parks Homepage  

To visit a city website, click on the link below...
Apache Junction | Avondale | Buckeye | Carefree | Cave Creek | Chandler | El Mirage | Fountain Hills | Gila Bend | Gilbert | Glendale | Goodyear | Guadalupe | Litchfield Park | Mesa | Paradise Valley | Peoria | Phoenix | Queen Creek | Scottsdale | Surprise | Tempe | Tolleson | Wickenburg | Youngtown

 

 

  Maricopa Home      Site Map      Legal Information      Privacy/Security Policies
Maricopa County Home Page
Maricopa County || 301 W. Jefferson St. || Phoenix, AZ 85003
602-506-3011